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What A Perfectly Beautiful Little Lady WDCC Disney Classics Sculpture

Sculpted by Gwen Dutcher
Includes Certificate of Authenticity

Medium
Disney Classics Collection Sculpture
Artwork Dimensions
3 and 1/2 inches tall

$175.00

Available

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Product Description

What A Perfectly Beautiful Little Lady WDCC Disney Classics Sculpture

Sculpted by Gwen Dutcher
Backstamped with the Production Year
Comes with Certificate of Authenticity
Serial Number: 11K-41327-0
Limited Edition Production - Only produced in 1999
Retired in December 1999

Special Materials:
Hatbox: Porcelain with opalescent ribbons

Member gift for new members or members who renewed their subscription to the Walt Disney Collector's Society in 1999.

The Walt Disney Classics Collection (WDCC) is a series of collectible sculptures of Disney characters and scenes. The sculptures were initially done under the supervision of the Disney animators, and were hand painted and produced in limited editions. They were introduced in July 1992. The sculptures often sold in the secondary market at a multiple of the initial sale price.

On Lady and the Tramp story development:

In 1937 Disney story man Joe Grant came up with an idea inspired by the antics of his dog Lady, and how she got "shoved aside" by Joe's new baby. He approached Walt Disney with sketches of Lady. Disney enjoyed the sketches and commissioned Grant to start story development on a new animated feature Lady. Through the late 1930s and early 1940s, Joe Grant and other artists worked on the story, taking a variety of approaches, but Disney wasn't pleased with any of them, primarily because he thought Lady was too sweet, and there wasn't enough action.

In the early 1940s, Walt read the short story written by Ward Greene, "Happy Dan, The Whistling Dog", in Cosmo magazine. He thought Grant's story would be improved if Lady fell in love with a cynical dog character like the one in Greene's story and bought the rights to it. The cynical dog had various names during development, including Homer, Rags, and Bozo, before "Tramp" was chosen.