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Lady and the Tramp: Bella Notte Limited Edition Publicity Cel

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This classic Lady and the Tramp Bella Notte limited edition publicity cel captures everyone's favorite moment from the film! Bella Notte means beautiful night in Italian, hence the song lyrics.

Read our blog about the 65th anniversary of Lady and the Tramp!

About Lady and the Tramp:

Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 American animated musical romance film produced by Walt Disney and released by Buena Vista Film Distribution. It was the first animated film distributed by the company. The 15th Disney animated feature film, it was the first animated feature filmed in the CinemaScope widescreen film process.

Based on the 1945 Cosmopolitan magazine story of "Happy Dan, The Cynical Dog" by Ward Greene, Lady and the Tramp tells the story of a female American Cocker Spaniel named Lady who lives with a refined, upper-middle-class family and a male stray mutt called the Tramp. When the two dogs meet, they embark on many romantic adventures and fall in love.

Lady and the Tramp was released to theaters on June 22, 1955 to box office success. It initially received mixed to negative reviews by film critics, but critical reception for the film has been generally positive in modern times, and the film is now seen as one of the best animated films from Disney. Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, and Hamilton Luske, the film features the voices of Barbara Luddy, Larry Roberts, Bill Thompson, Bill Baucom, Verna Felton, and Peggy Lee.

The film's opening sequence, in which Darling unwraps a hat box on Christmas morning and finds Lady inside, is inspired by an incident when Walt Disney presented his wife Lily with a Chow puppy as a gift in a hat box to make up for having previously forgotten a dinner date with her.

As they had done with deer on Bambi, the animators studied many dogs of different breeds to capture the movement and personality of dogs. Although the spaghetti eating sequence is probably now the best-known scene from the film, Walt Disney was prepared to cut it, thinking that it would not be romantic and that dogs eating spaghetti would look silly. Animator Frank Thomas was against Walt's decision and animated the entire scene himself without any lay-outs. Walt was impressed by Thomas's work and how he romanticized the scene and kept it in. On viewing the first take of the scene, the animators felt that the action should be slowed down, so apprentice trainee Willie Ito was assigned to create "half numbers" in between many of the original frames.

Originally, the background artist was supposed to be Mary Blair and she did some inspirational sketches for the film. However, she left the studio to become a children's book illustrator in 1953. Claude Coats was then appointed as the key background artist. Coats made models of the interiors of Jim Dear and Darling's house, and shot photos and film at a low perspective as reference to maintain a dog's view.