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Autumn Portrait Winnie the Pooh Embellished Giclee on Canvas by James Coleman

James Coleman is an American painter who has worked for Disney as a background artist on numerous animated features. In 1991, after twenty-two years working for Disney, James left to pursue the true passion in his life, fine art. However, James couldn’t stay away from Disney for too long. Eventually he found himself mixing fine art with those all too familiar Disney Characters he had worked alongside for so many years.

SKU
AI-8107-1
Medium
Embellished Giclee On Canvas
Artwork Dimensions
24 x 12
Edition Size
195

$600.00

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Product Description

This Autumn Portrait Winnie the Pooh Embellished Giclee on Canvas by James Coleman captures the friendship so important to Winnie the Pooh and his pals.

Autumn Portrait by James Coleman is another example of his great work representing these beloved characters.

About James Coleman:

James Coleman is a renowned artist who acted as supervisor of the Background Department for Disney for 17 years.  His work can be seen in such Disney classics as "The Rescuers," "Mickey's Christmas Carol," "The Great Mouse Detective," "The Little Mermaid," and "Beauty and the Beast."

James Coleman was born in Hollywood, California. His first job at Disney Studios was one his mother, a secretary there, got for him. It was in the mailroom...but it was a paycheck, and eventually led him to meet the right people. His big break came when he entered a painting in the Disney Studio Art Show. A man named Ken Anderson, a top artist and story man for Disney, saw his potential and encouraged James to go into animation background painting. This landed him his first gig as a background painter on Disney's "The Rescuers".

"This was a major event for me. At first, I didn't realize just how major it was. But it literally changed my life. I had no idea what it would lead to." Well, it led to a career spanning nearly three decades and more than 25 films. But Coleman's true passion always laid in Fine Art, and he eventually left Disney in order to pursue this field full time. He likens this life changing decision to a window needing to be opened:

"Windows can be intimidating because you don't know what's out there. But once you step through it, you're faced with this enormous amount of possibility. I never liked looking at windows directly, because once I see one, I have to go through it."

However, James couldn't stay away from Disney for too long. Eventually he found himself mixing fine art with those all too familiar Disney Characters he had worked alongside for so many years.

ABOUT THE ORIGIN OF WINNIE THE POOH:

A. A. Milne named the character Winnie-the-Pooh after a teddy bear owned by his son, Christopher Robin Milne, on whom the character Christopher Robin was based. The rest of Christopher Milne's toys – PigletEeyore, Kanga, Roo, and Tigger – were incorporated into Milne's stories. Two more characters, Owl and Rabbit, were created by Milne's imagination, while Gopher was added to the Disney version. Christopher Robin's toy bear is on display at the Main Branch of the New York Public Library in New York City.

Christopher Milne had named his toy bear after Winnie, a Canadian black bear he often saw at London Zoo, and Pooh, a swan they had encountered while on holiday. The bear cub was purchased from a hunter by Canadian Lieutenant Harry Colebourn in White River, Ontario, while en route to England during the First World War. He named the bear Winnie after his adopted hometown in WinnipegManitoba. Winnie was surreptitiously brought to England with her owner, and gained unofficial recognition as The Fort Garry Horse regimental mascot. Colebourn left Winnie at the London Zoo while he and his unit were in France; after the war she was officially donated to the zoo, as she had become a much-loved attraction there. Pooh the swan appears as a character in its own right in When We Were Very Young.

The American writer William Safire surmised that the Milnes' invention of the name "Winnie the Pooh" may have also been influenced by the haughty character Pooh-Bah in Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado (1885)